LTV business scaling

What is customer lifetime value, and how does it impact my business?

What does LTV mean, and how does it impact my business?

LTV stands for customer lifetime value, and measuring it can revolutionize your business.

Most businesses determine their ad spend based off their return on investment from said ad spend. Unfortunately though, many people calculate the return on ad spend (ROAS) exclusively based off the initial order value. If you calculate your ROAS exclusively based off initial purchase value, you are most likely missing out on explosive growth, just like our client Danette May. See the video below to hear more about their story:

As you can see from that video, knowing the true lifetime value of their customers made all of the difference for them. They couldn’t scale that funnel reliably without increasing their budget; but they thought that they couldn’t increase the budget on the funnel and still have an allowable ROAS. They had made all of these calculations based off the initial order value though. By widening their scope and tracking the lifetime value of those customers, they realized that they could still get an allowable ROAS even if they increased their budget.

Upon increasing their ad spend, they were able to scale up that funnel tremendously and they went from 15 sales per day to over 200 sales per day in less than a month. Since this video was recorded, they went as high as 600 sales per day and are now averaging about 300 sales per day. That is the power of knowing your true customer lifetime value.

How does LTV impact finance?

While LTV in and of itself can completely change the way that you view customer journey’s and their acquisition costs, the true power of customer LTV comes when you combine it with a few other metrics. Once you know the true value of your customers, the next thing that you need to know is the true cost of goods sold on what you sell. To get the true cost of goods sold for your products, you need to roll in everything, legitimately everything. You need to break down the cost of every employee, all of your overhead, every cost that your business has needs to be tied into this metric.

Once you know the true LTV of your clients, and your true cost of goods sold (COGS), you can now start to look at how much money you make off each client and each product that you sell. You may find that on some funnels you’re not profitable off the initial purchase, but that the clients come back and repurchase multiple times over several months, making that customer profitable overall. From there, the finance team can determine acceptable timetables for profitability. Some businesses have funnels that they know will not turn a profit for several months, but they know that it will be profitable within a certain acceptable time frame for them as well.

Once you know the acceptable profitability time frame, you can begin to work out an acceptable cost per acquisition, which leads us into our next section:

How does LTV impact marketing?

Now that you know the path to profitability and the timeline for it; you can begin to look at how much you can acceptably spend on advertising costs. By studying your cost per acquisition (CPA), you can understand how much ad spend you will need in order to get one person to convert. From there, you can rework this into your established cost of goods sold, and look at your timeline for profitability. We recommend that you find the absolute maximum allowable CPA, and then make sure that you stay underneath that threshold.

The next step in your journey is to get even more granular in how you measure your customer lifetime value. Since your allowable acquisition cost is based off the lifetime value of your clients, it makes sense to break out the lifetime value based off where they came from as well.

In this next video, we show you exactly what that looks like.

As shown in the video, clients who come from different referral sources behave differently. They may be interested in different things based off the type of content that drove them to your site. This will affect the items that they buy, and in turn, their lifetime value as your customer. You can also take this analysis even further by segmenting your customer LTV based off the initial item that they purchased.

How can I start tracking the LTV of my customers?

The hardest part of finding the true LTV of your customers is extracting all of the data from all of the disparate systems. The average small business uses at least nine different systems to track different things, though many have more than that. In order to get a clear picture on the true LTV of all of your customers, you need to gather all of that data. This is a tedious, difficult process known as ETL (Extract, Transform, Load).

The first step of ETL is data extraction. It takes a lot of time to extract data from all of the disparate systems, but it’s rather simple to do. From there, you need to make sure that all of the data meshes together properly. This leads us into the transformation stage.

Transforming data requires a lot of time and mental energy to complete. Each system tracks things differently, so you have to go through and realign the data to make sure that it matches properly between the different tracking systems.

The last stage is the simplest stage and, generally speaking, the one that everyone jumps to. The load stage consists of taking your new, clean data and loading it into a visualization tool so that you can see all of the information that you have gathered in one place.

Many people jump straight to the load phase and get a data visualization tool without having the previous two steps, and that leaves them with a pretty dashboard that doesn’t tell them anything new. The process of ETL is VITAL for you to find your true LTV and of paramount importance for you to propel your business forward.

If you need help with this, we have helped countless businesses go through this process. Simply fill out this form, and we can talk about the unique needs of your business and how we can help you turn your data into growth: https://praxismetrics.com/talk-to-a-data-expert/

The importance of knowing the lifetime value of your customers

Data-Driven Conversations: The Importance of Knowing The Lifetime Value of Your Customers

What is the lifetime value of a customer? How does that affect the way that you market your products and scale your business?

These are some of the questions that we had in mind when we went into our conversation with Jeremy Reeves on the Data Rich Podcast. Below is the video of the entire conversation, as well as a transcript of the highlights:

What does it mean to be data driven as it relates to customer LTV?

Being data driven boils down to being aware of the choices that you are making, and making the right choices by utilizing data.

An example of this would be if you are looking to roll out a new product, you need to know exactly how much you can spend to acquire a new customer. If you don’t have data to tell you that information, you are essentially guessing, and that can cause you to be limiting yourself in terms of growth if you’re not paying enough for new customers, or it can be driving you out of business if you’re spending too much to acquire those customers.

If you don’t know the metrics, you don’t know what decisions to make.

How soon in a business should you worry about LTV?

This varies from business to business, but comes down to how quickly you want to scale your business. If you are looking for explosive growth, then LTV is THE metric that you need to worry about. This will help you determine the cost per acquisition that you are willing to pay. In the example above, they realized that if they set their break-even point per customer at 3 months rather than immediate, they were able to pay 30% more per acquisition, which allowed them to jump from making 15 sales per day to making 300-400 sales per day.

By drilling into the numbers and truly understanding the value of their customers over time, their sales were able to increase by 2500%! When you view the true value of a customer over time, you can make decisions like this that help you to experience explosive growth as a company.

How do you maximize returns based off customer LTV?

The best way to maximize your returns is to get extremely granular with your data. Go beyond just looking at the generic LTV of all customers, and see the LTV of customers based off of their referral source, or check to see what other products they purchase after the initial purchase. The more that you can break down the data and individualize your targeting, the more you can glean insights into your consumers, and in turn maximize your returns.

What is the best way to track LTV?

This is the question that you really need to answer for your business. You need to determine how you want to define and track the value of your customers over time. This will be contingent on the systems that you are using, the types of products that you sell, and how you want to think about your products.

Going back to the previous point about getting as granular as possible, you can break down the LTV of your clients based off what their initial purchase was, by referrer,

When should you make changes to your budget based off the LTV calculation?

Unfortunately, just like the last question, this depends on your business. If your company has a long buying cycle, you should probably wait to increase your budget until you see the results from your efforts. If you are able to make back your budget based off the initial purchase, you can increase your budget immediately. By understanding when people are able to hit that break-even point in your business, you can know exactly when you should increase your spend.

How can I set up tracking to make sure that I am getting good data?

You need to make sure that your attributions are set up properly in Google Analytics, so that you can break out customer behavior by traffic source in order to see exactly what your spend should be for each source. Past that, it is highly recommended that you break them out into funnels or campaigns that you are using so that you can properly attribute the LTV to each of the campaigns that you run, as well as the sources.

This requires a great deal of work up front, but once you lay the foundation of good data it is much easier to continue down that path, and you know that you can trust your data.

What is the number one thing that all marketers should know about the LTV of their customers?

The obvious first thing that you need is to know the number. If you are not conscious of the LTV of your customers, you need to find out what that is. After you are aware of the average LTV across the company, you need to get more granular with it, and drill down into the LTV per product.

Once you have those numbers, you need to determine your business goals. If you are in a growth stage of your business, where you are trying to scale, don’t be afraid to break even up front. Be aware of how long it will take for you to start profiting, and make sure that you are comfortable with waiting for that; but once you have determined that, you need to move forward. The business that can afford to spend the most to acquire the customer wins every time.

If you have any questions about dashboards, tracking, analytics, or if you want custom dashboards built for your business then talk to one of our data experts.